What does a 3.5 tennis rating mean?

A person with a 3.5 tennis rating still lacks depth and variety with shots but has improved on direction of shots as well as improved court coverage.

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In this regard, what are the different levels of tennis?

The 4 main tennis levels are the NTRP, UTR, ITF, and ATP. The NTRP is used to place players in appropriate leagues.

Accordingly, what is a 4.0 level tennis player? 4.0. Intermediate-Advanced Player: Has dependable strokes, including directional control and depth on both forehand and backhand sides plus the ability to use lobs, overheads, approach shots and volleys with some success. May be starting to master the use of power and spins (though tends to over-hit difficult shots).

Keeping this in view, what is a Level 2 tennis player?

General Characteristics of Various Playing Levels

2.0: This player needs on-court experience. This player has obvious stroke weaknesses, but is familiar with basic positions for singles and doubles play. 2.5: This player is learning to judge where the ball is going although court coverage is weak.

What is a Level 3 tennis player?

Level 3.0. You are fairly consistent when hitting medium-paced shots, but are not comfortable with all strokes and lack execution when trying for directional control, depth, or power.

What is the difference between a 3.5 and 4.0 tennis player?

The 3.5 is simply trying to keep the ball in play. The 3.5 player will win points and games by staying in rallies and letting the 4.0 make mistakes. Whereas the 4.0 will win games by forcing errors and hitting more winners.

What is the highest level of tennis?

Of all the descriptions of plaver levels — from “A, B and C” to “beginner, intermediate, advanced” — the best system was developed bv the U.S. Tennis Association in 1979. The USTA defines player levels on a scale from 1.0 to 7.0 in its National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP).

What is the lowest ranking in tennis?

Junior NTRP Ratings: The rating scale for junior players is shown in tenths, starting with 2.0, which is the lowest, progressing to 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, etc., until 7.0, which is the highest rating given to world-class players with ATP/WTA points.

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